Category Archives: Physics

Meeting with Aram Harrow, and my Lecture on Why Quantum Computers Cannot Work.

Last Friday, I gave a lecture at the quantum information seminar at MIT entitled “Why quantum computers cannot work and how.” It was a nice event with lovely participation during the talk, and a continued discussion after it. Many very … Continue reading

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Symplectic Geometry, Quantization, and Quantum Noise

Over the last two meetings of our HU quantum computation seminar we heard two talks about symplectic geometry and its relations to quantum mechanics and quantum noise. Yael Karshon: Manifolds, symplectic manifolds, Newtonian mechanics, quantization, and the non squeezing theorem. … Continue reading

Posted in Computer Science and Optimization, Geometry, Physics | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Quantum Fault-Tolerance Debate Updates

In a couple of days, we will resume the debate between Aram Harrow and me regarding the possibility of universal quantum computers and quantum fault tolerance. The debate takes place over GLL (Godel’s Lost Letter and P=NP) blog. The Debate Where were … Continue reading

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A Discussion and a Debate

Heavier than air flight of the 21 century? The very first post on this blog entitled “Combinatorics, Mathematics, Academics, Polemics, …” asked the question “Are mathematical debates possible?” We also had posts devoted to debates and to controversies. A few days ago, … Continue reading

Posted in Computer Science and Optimization, Controversies and debates, Information theory, Physics | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Aaronson and Arkhipov’s Result on Hierarchy Collapse

Scott Aaronson gave a thought-provoking lecture in our Theory seminar three weeks ago.  (Actually, this was eleven months ago.) The slides are here . The lecture discussed two results regarding the computational power of quantum computers. One result from this paper gives an … Continue reading

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Octonions to the Rescue

Xavier Dahan and Jean-Pierre Tillich’s Octonion-based Ramanujan Graphs with High Girth. Update (February 2012): Non associative computations can be trickier than we expect. Unfortunately, the paper by Dahan and Tillich turned out to be incorrect. Update: There is more to … Continue reading

Posted in Algebra and Number Theory, Combinatorics, Computer Science and Optimization, Open problems, Physics | Tagged , , , | 11 Comments

Benoît’s Fractals

Mandelbrot set Benoît Mandelbrot passed away a few dayes ago on October 14, 2010. Since 1987, Mandelbrot was a member of the Yale’s mathematics department. This chapterette from my book “Gina says: Adventures in the Blogosphere String War”   about fractals is brought here on this … Continue reading

Posted in Geometry, Obituary, Physics, Probability | 6 Comments

Itamar Pitowsky: Probability in Physics, Where does it Come From?

I came across a videotaped lecture by Itamar Pitowsky given at PITP some years ago on the question of probability in physics that we discussed in two earlier posts on randomness in nature (I, II). There are links below to … Continue reading

Posted in Obituary, Philosophy, Physics, Probability | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Randomness in Nature II

In a previous post we presented a MO question by Liza about randomness:  What is the explanation of the apparent randomness of high-level phenomena in nature? 1. Is it accepted that these phenomena are not really random, meaning that given enough … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy, Physics, Probability | Tagged , , , | 16 Comments

When Noise Accumulates

I wrote a short paper entitled “when noise accumulates” that contains the main conceptual points (described rather formally) of my work regarding noisy quantum computers.  Here is the paper. (Update: Here is a new version, Dec 2010.) The new exciting innovation in computer … Continue reading

Posted in Computer Science and Optimization, Physics | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments