The Hex-Voting-Rule (Not Recommended)

hex-rule

Blue wins – if there is a right to left continuous path of blue regions

Red wins – if there is north to south continuous path of red regions

(A region is red or blue according to the majority of voters.)

This method is very noise-sensitive.

12 thoughts on “The Hex-Voting-Rule (Not Recommended)

  1. Michael Lugo

    This would have interesting consequences for political strategy, as the map you gave is winning for red but just barely. In a few places the red region is only one county thick.

    Reply
  2. misuba

    Is there a way to maybe plot a single, optimal line through the north-south red-connecting regions? Maybe by population? (It shall be called the McCain-Palin Line, and when one crosses it, one shall know that… uh, I guess not really anything meaningful?)

    Reply
  3. kunal

    I think Hex transpose might be better :)

    Blue wins – if there is a north to south continuous path of blue regions

    Red wins – if there is left to right continuous path of red regions

    Reply
  4. samuel jackson

    Isnt there an ambiguity if the region is not convex?

    For instance, N-S line from Seattle to Frisco, and W-E line from Tampa to Miami is possible.

    Reply
  5. Erel Avineri

    Interesting problem. It has some similarities to the “Scramble for Africa” during the New Imperialism period, where rival imperialists (mainly the British and the French) attempted to form a continuous territory in Africa: The British Empire strategy was the establishment of a north-south axis (Cairo-Cape) while French main efforts where in East-West French Equatorial Africa.

    Of course it was not a question of African nations voting for any of these rivals…

    Take a look at this map from 1898 (British possessions are in yellow, French possessions in pink): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Africa1898.png.
    Who is winning?

    Reply
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