Tag Archives: Robert Alicki

Pictures from Recent Quantum Months


A special slide I prepared for my lecture at Gdansk featuring Robert Alicki and I as climber on the mountain of quantum computers “because it is not there.”

It has been quite a while since I posted here about quantum computers. Quite a lot happened in the last months regarding this side of my work, and let me devote this post mainly to pictures. So here is a short summary going chronologically backward in time. Last week – Michel Dyakonov visited Jerusalem, and gave here the condensed matter physics seminar on the spin Hall effect. A couple of weeks before in early January we had the very successful Jerusalem physics winter school on Frontier in quantum information. (Here are the recorded lectures.) Last year I gave my evolving-over-time lecture on why quantum computers cannot work in various place and different formats in Beer-Sheva, Seattle, Berkeley, Davis (CA), Gdansk, Paris, Cambridge (US), New-York, and Jerusalem. (The post about the lecture at MIT have led to a long and very interesting discussion mainly with Peter Shor and Aram Harrow.) In August I visited Robert Alicki, the other active QC-skeptic, in Gdansk and last June I took part in organizing a (successful) quantum information conference Qstart in Jerusalem (Here are the recorded lectures.).

And now some pictures in random ordering

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With Robert Alicki in Gdynia near Gdansk


With (from left) Connie Sidles, Yuri Gurevich, John Sidles and Rico Picone in Seattle  (Victor Klee used to take me to the very same restaurant when I visited Seattle in the 90s and 00s.) Update: Here is a very interesting post on GLL entitled “seeing atoms” on John Sidles work.


With Michel Dyakonov (Jerusalem, a few days ago)


With Michal Horodecki in Sopot  near Gdansk (Michal was a main lecturer in our physics school a few weeks ago.)


Aram Harrow and me meeting a year ago at MIT.

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Sometimes Robert and I look skeptically in the same direction and other times we look skeptically in opposite directions. These pictures are genuine! Our skeptical face impressions are not staged. The pictures were taken by Maria, Robert’s wife. Robert and I are working for many years (Robert since 2000 and I since 2005) in trying to examine skeptically the feasibility of quantum fault-tolerance. Various progress in experimental quantum error-correction and other experimental works give good reasons to believe that our views could be examined in the rather near future.


A slide I prepared for a 5-minute talk at the QSTART rump session referring to the impossibility of quantum fault-tolerance as a mild earthquake with wide impact.

GTprod2This is a frame from the end-of-shooting of a videotaped lecture on “Why quantum computers cannot work” at the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing at Berkeley. Producing a videotaped lecture is a very interesting experience! Tselil Schramm (in the picture holding spacial sets of constant width) helped me with this production.

Mittag-Leffler Institute and Yale, Winter 2005; Test your intuition: Who Played the Piano?

This is a little “flashback” intermission in my posts about my debate with Aram Harrow. This time I try to refer to Cris Moore’s question regarding  the motivation for my study. For the readers it gives an opportunity to win a $50 prize! 

Let me also bring to your attention an interesting discussion (starting here) between Peter Shor and me regarding smoothed Lindblad evolutions.

(Cris Moore, the debate’s very first comment!) I am also a little confused by Gil’s motivation for his conjectures.  (My response:)  To the best of my memory, my main motivation for skeptically studying quantum fault-tolerance was that I thought that this is a direction worth pursuing and that I had a shot at it.

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While listening with Ravi Kannan to this 2002 lecture by Michel Devoret at Yale, I wondered if there are enough scientists working on the “mirage” side.

Flashback: Mittag-Leffler 2005

I started systematically thinking about quantum fault-tolerance in February 2005. There were several things that triggered my interest to the question in the previous fall and I decided to spend some time learning and thinking about it in our winter break.  One of those triggers was something Dorit Aharonov told me a few months earlier: she said that once, when she was telling her students about quantum computers, she suddenly had a feeling that maybe it was all just nonsense. Another trigger came from a former student who told me about a Polish scientist (whose name he could not remember) who wrote an article about impossibility of quantum error-correction. I thought that the lack of a quantum analog of the repetition code, and the unique properties of the majority function  in terms of sensitivity to noise that I studied with Itai Benjamini and Oded Schramm earlier could be a good starting point for looking skeptically at quantum computers.  

In our 2005 winter break, I spent two weeks at Yale and then additional two weeks at the Mittag-Leffler institute near Stockholm.  At Yale, I only had little time to think about quantum computers. I had to finish a survey article with Muli Safra about threshold phenomena (To a volume that Cris Moore and Allon Perkus were among the editors).  One of the last days in Yale we went to dinner with two guests, Chris Skinner who gave the colloquium talk, and Andrei Okounkov who visited me and gave a talk about partition enumeration and mirror symmetry. At the dinner Andrew Casson asked, out of the blue, if we think that quantum computers can be built and it almost seemed as if that Andrew was reading my mind on what I plan to work on the weeks to come. My answer there was the same as my answer now, that I tend to find it implausible.

Mittag-Leffler Institute February 2005 with Xavier Viennot and Alain Lascoux

In Sweden I spent most of my time on quantum fault-tolerance. I was jet-lagged and being jet-lagged in the Mittag-Leffler institute already worked for me once, when finding my subexponential randomized variant of the simplex algorithm was a substitute for sleeping some night in fall 1991 . In 2005 it was not as bad, I just came to my office very early in the morning and started working. And very early in the morning somebody was already playing the piano.

And who was playing the piano at the institute in the cold Swedish mornings of February 2005? The first reader to guess correctly, and convince me in a comment that she or he knows the answer without revealing it to everybody else will get $50. Continue reading