Tag Archives: Rationality

Is More Sex Safe? A book review.

I was asked by the Notices of the AMS to review the book “More Sex is Safe Sex: The Unconventional Wisdom  of Econmics” by Steven E. Landsburg.  My review entitled “Economics and Common Sense”, will appeared in the June/July issue of the Notices and you can find it here. (And in the August issue of the AMS Notices, there is will be a book review by Olle Häggström on John Allen Paulos’ new book: “Irreligion”.)

In his book, Steven E. Landsburg uses the “weapons of evidence and logic, especially the logic of economics” to draw surprising insights which run against common sense. “If common sense tells you otherwise,” says Landsburg, “remember that common sense also tells you that the Earth is flat”.     

I will include a few little sectionettes from the review here in this post. Some of the issues raised in this book are related to many discussions and debates we had over the years at the Center for the Study of Rationality of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Questions regarding “efficiency,” “subsedies,” “monopolies,” “labor union,” “differential salaries,” “law and economics,” “rationality and the judicial system,” and various other related topics were amply discussed at the Center, and some of these topics and discussions are related to issues raised in Landsburg’s book.


The Unconventional Wisdom of Economics



The Armchair Economist 

Sometime after writing my review, I saw in the Yale book store, along with several copies of Landsburg’s new book, a copy of his older book from the early 90s, “The Armchair Economist”. I bought it and read some of the chapters. So before quoting excerpts from my book review on the new book let me first talk a little bit about the older book. Several chapters are devoted to describing some classic teachings of economics, such as general equilibrium theory, and they are very good. I liked Landsburg’s explanation of the notion of “efficiency” – it is the best popular explanation of “efficiency” I read or listened to.

The Peltzman Effect

Armchair Economist starts with an interesting finding from the 1970s by Sam Peltzman, a U. of Chicago economist, asserting that safety seat belts have led to an increase in the number of car accidents, and that the net effect on death from car-accidents, which is reduced by the direct effect of seat belts and other safety measures, but which at the same time is increased by the indirect effect of drivers taking more risks because of these safety measures, is close to zero. Peltzman’s study also asserts that seat belts have raised pedestrian death toll caused by accidents.

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